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RESTAURANTS

barbetta
Barbetta today

Barbetta 321 West 46th st.

Owned by the same family for more than a century, Barbetta was opened in 1906 by Sebastiano Maioglio and is now owened by his daughter. Barbetta is the oldest restaurant in New York that is still owned and operated by it's founding family.

JohnsPizza
John's of 12th

John's of
12th st.
302 East 12th st.

Open since 1908, this classic Italian restaurant looks and feels as if it hasn't changed much since the early days, with its well-worn original tile floors, red leather banquettes and a candle that has been burning and collecting ever-expanding drippings since 1937.



Katz's Katz's Delicatessen

205 East Houston St (Ludlow Street)

The oldest delicatessen in New York City (established 1888), Katz's is also the only place in town that still carves all its pastrami and corned beef by hand—and it makes a huge difference. The ritual of interacting with the countermen is one of the great New York experiences. One table in the middle of the dining room bears an inconspicuous paper sign taped to its surface: "You are sitting at the table where Harry met Sally." — Steven A. Shaw
Read more: Katz's Delicatessen - Lower East Side - New York Magazine Restaurant Guide http://nymag.com/listings/restaurant/katzs-delicatessen/#ixzz0aqMXULLL



During World War II, Katz's encouraged parents to "send a salami to your boy in the army" which became one of the deli's famous catch phrases,along with "Katz's, that's all!" which is still painted on the side of the building. The former phrase is referenced in the Tom Lehrer song "So Long Mom (A Song for World War III)", with the lyric "Remember Mommy, I'm off to get a commie, so send me a salami, and try to smile somehow".
Katz's continues its "Send a salami to your boy in the army" to this day. The deli has arranged special international shipping only for U.S. military addresses and has been a source of gift packages to the troops stationed in Afghanistan and Iraq.




Lanza
Lanza Restaurant

Lanza Restaurant
168 First Ave(10th and11th streets)

A real store-front Italian restaurant since 1904, still with the original pressed-tin ceiling, hand-painted walls, and an open kitchen where you can see dinner cooking.

Locals have been eating here forever.

Manganaro's
Manganaro's

Manganaro's
Grosseria
488 Ninth Ave(37th and 38th)

This Manangaro family opened a wine and liquor store here in 1893 called Petrucci's but when Prohibition closed it down, a nephew named James moved his simple Italian groceria to this location and the name was changed to Manganaro's. The place today is still very much the same as it was then.

Loyal customers line up, cafeteria style, to order their authentic Italian specialty food.




ThePalm
The Palm Restaurant

The Palm 837 Second Avenue80 years at this location

The Palm Restaurant's flagship location. In 1926 Italian immigrants Pio Bozzi and John Ganzi opened the first Palm restaurant.
A defining feature of the restaurant has been the tradition of caricatures covering the walls. Those depicted in the murals are celebrities, famous politicians, as well as prominent sports and media figures.
The caricature tradition began as a twist on the phrase "sing for your meal" where an artist who enjoyed the fare would pay for his meal by drawing a portrait on the wall. Celebrities have often left autographs next to their portraits.



Raos
Roa's
Rao's 455 East 114th St

Charles Rao purchased a corner saloon here in 1896. After Charles' death in 1909, his brother Joseph took over and he kept the bar open through the years of Prohibition when wine, made by a neighbor, was pumped into Roa's thruogh a hose.

After Repeal, the family turned the bar into a restaurant and it has outlasted all it's neighbors.

It is difficult to get a seat here because each of the eight tables is booked into perpetuity by the restaurant's regulars.

Roa's bottled sauces, roasted peppers, and line of artisanal pastas are sold throughout the country.


sardis
Sardi's today

sardi's_sign
Sardi's 234 West 44th Street

Known for the hundreds of caricatures of show-business celebrities that adorn its walls, Sardi's opened at its current location on March 5, 1927.

Vincent Sardi, Sr. and his wife Eugenia ("Jenny") Pallera  opened their first eatery, The Little Restaurant, at 146 West 44th Street in 1921. When that building was slated for demolition in 1926, they accepted an offer from the theater magnates, the Shubert brothers, to relocate to a new building the brothers were erecting down the block. The new restaurant, Sardi's, opened March 5, 1927.
When business slowed after the move, Vincent Sardi was looking for a gimmick to attract customers. Recalling the movie-star caricatures that decorated the walls of a Parisian restaurant and jazz club, Sardi decided to recreate that effect in his establishment. He hired a Russian refugee named Alex Gard to do drawings of Broadway celebrities. Sardi and Gard drew up a contract that stated that Gard would make the caricatures in exchange for one meal per day at the restaurant. When Sardi’s son, Vincent Sardi, Jr., took over restaurant operations in 1947, he offered to change the terms of Gard's agreement. Gard refused and continued to draw the caricatures in exchange for meals until his death.

The restaurant became known as a pre– and post–theater hang-out, as well as a location for opening night parties. Vincent Sardi, a theater lover, kept the restaurant open much later than others in the area to accommodate the schedules of Broadway performers.

Sardi's in the movies:
Please Don't Eat the Daisies, with Doris Day (1960)
Critic's Choice (1963) - While this Bob Hope–Lucille Ball film was shot in Hollywood, the Sardi's interior was authentically recreated with menus, plates, and memorabilia sent from the restaurant.
No Way to Treat a Lady (1968)
Made for Each Other with Renée Taylor and Joseph Bologna (1971)
The Fan (1981)
The King of Comedy (1983) - Small time comic Robert De Niro dines with talk-show star Jerry Lewis. (see clip below) Includes an appearance by Sardi's caricaturist Richard Baratz
The Muppets Take Manhattan (1984)
Radio Days (1987)
Naked in New York (1993)
The Producers (2005) - The restaurant's exterior was recreated for a street scene in this screen adaptation of the 2001 Broadway musical.



venieros
Veniero’s Pastry Shop & Caffe’
Veniero’s Pastry Shop & Caffe’ 342 East 11th Street (near 1st Avenue)

Opened in 1894 as a pool emporium and caffe’ by Antonio Veniero, it his been continuously owned and operated by the Veniero family for over one hundred fifteen years now. 
As word of his baking skills spread, the demand for Veniero’s pastries and cakes spread as well, winning him awards in Rome, Bolognia, and the New York World’s Fair. 
Today the Pastry shop and caffé has many of its original details, including hand stamped metal ceilings, specially designed etched glass doors, highly polished wood mirrors, and ornate marble floors.  Upon entering the pastry shop, you are greeted by a wonderful display of traditional and regional Italian confections, a vast variety of large and miniature pastries, and assortments of hand-made Italian butter cookies. Take in the aroma of the freshly baked biscotti (Italian biscuits) as well as the traditional cheese cakes and specialty cakes. A full 40 feet of heaven for the dessert lover! 
On the Food Network program Road Tasted, where the hosts drive across the United States looking for the best family-run food businesses, Veniero’s was featured on the New York City episode.


Vincent's_clam
Vincent's Clam Bar

Vincent's Clam Bar
119 Mott St
1904


Angelo's_of_mulberry
Angelo of Mullbery St.

Angelo of Mulberry St.
146 Mulberry St.
1902



lombardi's_pizza
Lombardi's Pizza

Lombardi's Pizza
32 Spring St.
1905
This is the direct decendent of the first pizza parlor in the country.






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